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See The Rise, Exposures
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See The Rise
Exposures



Genre(s): Rock / Hardcore
Album length: 10 tracks: 39 minutes, 23 seconds
Street Date: June 30, 2015

  


The members of hardcore band, See the Rise, have faced more heartbreak in their early years than most bands will suffer in their entire careers. This heartbreak was the fuel that inspired their E.P. The Theft. The seven song introduction, based on John 10:10, showed a fair deal of potential, but ultimately fell short in portraying what the band was truly capable of. However, the band's debut full length, Exposures, takes a massive leap forward, packing tightly all the potential promised before, and releasing it in a hurricane of hardcore goodness.

The album begins with a savagely honest spoken word track that slowly intensifies until the title track, "Exposures," fires the bullet that sends the album running. It's evident from the start that the entire band has greatly improved, wiping away any doubts previously held. The momentum continues with "Treasure," an instant highlight that blends rock and hardcore with near flawless execution. Josh Myers' screams are strong and commanding in the verses while Brian Elliott's cleans soar through the chorus without ever feeling thrown in for melody's sake. Other highlights include "Second Chance," "Self Portrait," (which includes a vocally distorted breakdown that is sure to get the listener moving) "Spotlights," and the subdued finisher, "With You."

Thematically the album doesn't shy away from the dark. It's an honest exploration of identity and salvation amidst a world ripe in its fallen ways. The title track warns of the dangers of self-deception, "You're so broken and you think you have a clue, can't you just see life the way that I do? The most dangerous thing about a liar (liar) is when they think what they're saying is true." "Self Portrait" wrestles with doubt and self-worth, "I wear my heart on my sleeve, it's so hard to believe that my picture's worth... Is worth a thousand words. In you, I made the right choice but how can I be the voice when I can't see myself the way that you do?" "Proverbs 7," undoubtedly inspired by the band's heartbreak, details the life and snares of the strange woman, "Seduced into a path of destruction, your innocence at the cost of seduction, she destroys your heart until your vows are broken," However, rather than ending grimly, the song encourages with the command, "Keep these words, keep these commands, guard your heart or you will die.... And in a moment, you'll walk away, a lifetime is promised in a new day."

Musically the album tends to stick within a single formula: screamed/growled verse, a clean chorus, and a breakdown in the bridge before returning to the chorus. Although this formula is executed well, it often prevents songs from standing out and becoming their own. This is thankfully remedied by the emotional ballad, "With You," that brings the album to a close. Lead entirely by clean vocals until the final quarter, the song finishes the album with the final act of surrender, "I know I've failed before, but I'm not running anymore, because with you I'm so much more than what I was."

See the Rise have crafted an exceptionally strong debut with Exposures. While it doesn't aim to reinvent the genre, the raw lyrics, coupled with mature musicianship and a willingness to explore the questions and doubts we often hold, sets up Exposures as one of the strongest heavy releases of the year.

- Review date: 11/23/15, written by Lucas Munachen of Jesusfreakhideout.com
A Second Opinion
Stars
Exposures, the freshman full-length by Minnesota-based See the Rise, is metalcore as you used to know it. In recent times, it seems all that emerging bands have to offer the scene are semi-catchy choruses draped over power chords and hemmed in by heavy-handed breakdowns; how refreshing it is to come across this sort of divergence. Paying tribute to a standard formula while still displaying flashes of individuality, Exposures manages to hold up in an unfortunately exhausted genre. The release is solid, featuring the powerful cadences, coarse vocals, and heavy atmosphere that the self-ascribed nametag of "dirty Northern hardcore" promises. Critically speaking, if there is a downfall to be found it is in the details. Production creates an understandable hurdle for many young artists, but somehow See the Rise manage to partly turn this challenge into a strength, adapting to recording imperfections in a manner that constructively augments their developing sound. In the end, the minute deficiencies are more alluring than distracting. It's a principle hardcore was founded upon, a do-it-yourself mentality and organized passion that is profound regardless of medium. As a result, it is easy to accept occasional frailty in the finer points as byproducts of immaturity and understandable room for growth. See the Rise are a lamppost in a dense fog and Exposures is their light offering. Attentive parties be warned: you would do well to heed their glow because it is only likely to intensify.

- Review date: 12/8/15, written by Jeremy Barnes of Jesusfreakhideout.com

 

. Record Label: Voluminous Records
. Album length: 10 tracks: 39 minutes, 23 seconds
. Street Date: June 30, 2015
. Buy It: iTunes
. Buy It: Amazon
. Buy It: AmazonMP3

  1. 5:8 (0:59)
  2. Exposures (3:54)
  3. Treasure (4:05)
  4. In Omnia Paratus (4:29)
  5. Second Chance (3:55)
  6. Self Portrait (3:41)
  7. Hope In The Storm (4:29)
  8. Proverbs 7 (3:42)
  9. Spotlights (4:43)
  10. With You (5:26)

 

 

 

 

 

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