Listen to the new album from Sara Groves!
Listen to the new album from Sara Groves!

JFH Staff Blog | June 2014

Monday, June 30, 2014

10 Years Later - Tree63, 'The Answer To The Question'

To fully understand my choice in highlighting Tree63, I must delve a little bit into my background.

In my youth, my interest (and exposure) to music was rather limited. I had been weaned on Rich Mullins, dabbled in the sounds of Steven Curtis Chapman, and been bored during church worship; that was pretty much it. As my brother was flourishing in his musical tastes (he had already started his collection of Jars of Clay material, ironically much to my annoyance), I found the whole thing uninteresting. Then a DVD extra on Jonah: A VeggieTales Movie introduced me to the Newsboys sometime soon after my 12th birthday in September 2003 (I had received that movie as a gift on that occasion). This started a massive chain reaction that fully awakened my interest in music. By December 2004, I had compiled a long list of firsts, including my first album purchased with my own money (Newsboys' Thrive), my first dud purchased with my own money (Newsboys' Devotion), my first Christian Rock album (Kutless' Sea of Faces), my first worship album (Chris Tomlin's Arriving), my first real favorite song ("Jesus Freak"), my first time listening to a band that was popular outside of "Christian" circles (Switchfoot), and so on.

But there was one more notable first which was more subtle, but far more meaningful: the first time I began to truly enjoy worshipping God through music. I can't pinpoint it to a day (though I think it may have been at camp), but I can pinpoint it to a song: "Blessed Be Your Name."

The Answer To The Question, the third Inpop release of South Africa's Tree63, was actually a CD that belonged to my brother, but I also really enjoyed it. It was an energetic pop-rock album that I could unashamedly sing along to and delve into the meaning of the words (2004 was also the first time I started doing that, as I began growing acutely aware that some music was "Christian" and some was "not"). To this day, I get goosebumps (even if only from nostalgia) listening to album opener "King," a song which definitely holds up as strongly today as it did then. "You Only" and "So Glad" were also favorites of mine, as was (of course) the South African trio's cover of Matt Redman's "Blessed Be Your Name." I still remember to this day, for the first time ever, hearing the worship band play the opening chords of that song, and singing the opening verse, thinking that it sounded familiar (but couldn't figure out where), and then suddenly realizing, "Hey, I listen to this song at home!" As a 12-year old, this was a really big deal for me; for the first time, worship became more interesting, and I wanted to pour myself more into it.

In all reality, I can't really say that there is anything "special," per say, about The Answer To The Question. Obviously, their version of Redman's classic has basically become the industry standard to this day (though, frankly, it is actually one of the weaker songs on the record), but all The Answer... really is is a solid pop-rock/worship album from a now-defunct band (the band ended in 2009 after one more studio album). That said, it does wonderfully capture the best of this era of the evolution of CCM, bridging the genre from the days of PFR and Seven Day Jesus and the rise of Sonicflood to the popular "worship music" movement of today. But to me personally, it captures this era of my life and my growth personally and spiritually. I'll admit that I hadn't listened to The Answer... for a couple of years until I was preparing to write this blog, but when I did, everything rushed back to me as clearly now as it did then. I remember all the songs, and they arguably hold up better now than, say, this year's Passion release will hold up a year from now. Those that haven't listened to Tree63's finest album, I recommend you do so, and if you have, give it another listen.

-- Mark Rice

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Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Matt Redman 'Mercy' Devotional

From the album "Your Grace Finds Me" - Matt Redman

Over the years I've had the privilege of visiting some very impacting places around this globe. I've been to townships in South Africa, a leper colony in India and shown around NASA by an astronaut. I've been to Buckingham Palace, and toured the White House. I've had the joy of leading worship in grand old venues like the Royal Albert Hall in London or the Ryman in Nashville. But there's one space I've been to which far outshines all of these other places and has had agreater impact on me than any other location ever could. It is Calvary, the place of the cross.

"I will kneel in the dust at the foot of the cross
Where mercy paid for me."

I've lost count of how many songs I've written about the cross of Christ over the years - but the reason is simple. It is the difference between life and death, between inescapable chains and eternal freedom. It's where love and justice kiss, and holiness and mercy meet. It happened over two thousand years ago, yet the event of the cross is standing just as strong and tall over history as it ever was. And take a look into the throne room of heaven, as described in the book of Revelation, and we're reminded that we shall be singing about it for all eternity:

"Then I looked and heard the voice of many angels, numbering thousands upon thousands, and ten thousand times ten thousand. They encircled the throne and the living creatures and the elders. In aloud voice they sang:

'Worthy is the Lamb who was slain,
to receive power and wealth and wisdom and strength
and honor and glory and praise!"

The cross, and to be specific, what our awesome Savior accomplished in that place, will forever lead us into wonder and mystery. How quickly we seem to lose the wonder of things in our lives. When man first set foot upon the moon it was athing of wonder. Everyone sat glued to their television screens, completely wowed by the marvel of what was occurring - for here was ahuman-being treading where we never dreamed could be possible. Now, several decades on, it's still an interesting and impactful historical moment - but you could argue that the sense of wonder has diminished a little with time. There may be several reasons for that - for one thing, we've got used to knowing about it. And perhaps another reason is that technology has advanced even further, so that humans are now living out there in the cosmos for extended periods of time, on the International Space Station.

When it comes to the cross of Jesus, it's an altogether different story. It's unlike any other moment in the unfolding of the years. Here is the very Son of God laying down His life in love, obedience and sacrifice. He who gave us first breath, breathing His last breath for our salvation. It's the most meaningful, costly and substantial act in all of history. The cross of Christ shall never lose its power, and never cease to be the most relevant and life-changing act mankind has ever seen. It can never be outdone, added to, or improved upon. Let us never cease to be awed by the sheer scale of grace and love that we discover in that place. As this song 'Mercy' prays:

"May I never lose the wonder, 0 the wonder of Your mercy. "

-- Matt Redman


Behind the song video: